13 November 2010

Breakfast Treats

Happy Saturday, all.  Weekends are a time for the occasional sweet indulgence, even at breakfast time.  I typically prefer savory meals to begin my day, but sometimes the allure of maple syrup-drizzled pancakes or waffles, scones, or cornbread is too powerful to resist.  That sweet presence doesn't necessarily prevent me from tempering it with a salty side; regardless, the first-meal-of-the-day focus will lean toward saccharine if the mood dictates.


Waffles are amongst my favorite non-savory breakfast foods.  I have long moved beyond the boxed biscuit-mixed incarnations--although the crispy, club soda-infused Heloise variation begs for a vegan remake--in favor of the equally simple, from-scratch cakes.  While I tend to default to my adaptation of the Pumpkin Waffles from Vegan with a Vengeance when the waffle craving strikes, I wanted to try something ever-so-slightly different this time around.  With just the perfect amount of pureed sweet potato in tow, I set about making a batch of Sweet Potato Ginger Waffles from 500 Vegan Recipes.  For the sake of simplicity (not that the recipe seemed difficult, by any means), I omitted the ginger candied nuts and focused solely on the waffles themselves. The only other adjustments were to reduce the amounts of cinnamon and ginger in the batter and add vanilla extract.  Admittedly, the resulting waffles were very similar to the Pumpkin Waffles, but I didn't mind.  The lightest touch of maple syrup completed the breakfast scenario nicely.
Although I try to limit morning food extravagances to the odd, lazy Saturday or Sunday, sometimes breakfast treats make weekday appearances.  A few days ago, I had a sudden, nostalgic urge to recreate a certain frosted toaster pastry I adored as a child.  An incredibly picky eater, I had very specific dietary preferences, one of them being that if made to choose between sweets involving either chocolate or fruit, the former always won without question and in whatever form available.  So it should come as no surprise that my toaster pastry of choice during childhood was of the cocoa-laden variety.  As I grew older and my tastes developed, the fruity flavors finally appealed to me.  But having already tried my hand at fruit-filled vegan toaster pies and realizing that I had never attempted a chocolate version, I opted for the latter, in all its chocolaty decadence.
The process seemed simple enough: make a chocolate pie crust, gooey chocolate filling, and chocolate icing.  Those basic components to the toaster pies certainly raised questions about the prepackaged inspiration's intended consumption as a breakfast item, but curiosity urged me to persist toward achieving my goal of chocolate toaster pies.  The haphazard creation came together rather easily.  I used a sweetened, cocoa-infused adaptation of this low-fat pastry; filled it with a blend of melted dark chocolate, almond meal, sugar, crushed chocolate wafers, almond milk, and vanilla extract; baked and cooled the rectangular pockets; then topped them with a cocoa-laced glaze and pearl sugar.  The toaster pies were sweet, rich, incredibly chocolaty handheld treats--not quite like the frosted toaster pastries of my youth, but rather like a more tender, fresher-tasting substitute.  I don't fancy eating these for breakfast unless I really want a heavy chocolate jolt to begin the day (I still question the sugary breakfast marketing scheme).  These are more appropriate as dessert items, and quick ones at that; the hard glaze actually allows for the pies to be reheated in the toaster for a decadent treat on the go--or breakfast, if you must.

12 comments:

  1. Wow, these look fabulous, and so much fun to make :)I definitely agree though that I don't think I could manage these for breakfast, more suitable dessert-material instead.

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  2. Wow, we don't have toaster pastries over here. I should start a business importing them.

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  3. I see what you mean about having those for breakfast- they're practically brownies! And they look amazing. I wonder if the frosting would melt in the toaster?

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  4. Woah! Amazing! I'd come to your place for breakfast any day.

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  5. OMG Tiffany. Just looking at the monitor has me nostalgic for childhood. I can taste them now...hot and melty right outta the toaster! If I wasn't walking out the door for an engagement party, I'd be making them right now!

    xoxo,
    LJ

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  6. what a delicious idea!

    have a nice time,
    Paula

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  7. Whoa! The pop tarts look soooo rich and yummy! One of the yummiest homemade poptarts I have ever seen. Would you mind telling me the proportions of the filling? Also, how did you adapt the recipe to make it a chocolate pastry? And one last question, do you have the recipe for the glaze? Thanks! It looks sooooo good. I can't emphasize enough. :)

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  8. Thanks for the kind words everyone! You guys are so awesome! :)

    Dianne,
    The icing hardens up pretty well, so toasting the pies for just a minute or so has so far not caused any problems with melting.

    Esther,
    Unfortunately, I didn't keep track of the measurements for each step, so I can't give more specifics about the process. :( Sorry! But I will probably play around with this more, in which case I'll try to post a more detailed description, perhaps even a recipe or tutorial, after all is said and done.

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  9. My heart is beating a bit quicker! I have got to try these!

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  10. My heart is beating a bit quicker! I have got to try these!

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  11. Wow, these look fabulous, and so much fun to make :)I definitely agree though that I don't think I could manage these for breakfast, more suitable dessert-material instead.

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Thanks for reading! Your comments are always welcome and appreciated. :)