09 November 2010

Never-Ending (Squash) Story

The massive hubbard squash I mentioned last week has yielded quite a bit of edible goodness--almost more than I can handle.  Hefty portions of cubed, raw squash and puree have been squirreled away in the freezer, meanwhile devising ways to enjoy the puree I had refrigerated for more immediate use.  I have finally exhausted the refrigerated squash today, allocating it to separate sweet and savory applications, respectively.


Taking advantage of the bracing morning chill and some free time, I put my oven back to use after its brief hiatus, baking up a batch of Pumpkin Molasses Power Bars from 500 Vegan Recipes.  Of course, hubbard squash replaced the pumpkin puree and regular molasses replaced blackstrap; both were fine substitutes.  Lacking an 8x8" pan, I baked the dough in a rectangular brownie pan for approximately 20 minutes, allowed it to cool, then cut it into 12 pieces.  The bars are dense, chewy, mildly sweet, and quite delicious.  I enjoyed one after a brief run as a hearty post-run treat.
The last of the hubbard puree, as mentioned, became part of Squash and Chickpea Bites, something like a cross between potato patties and falafel.  Hubbard squash has a fairly low moisture content--its taste and texture resembling that of sweet potato--providing structure to the chickpea mixture.  I did add ground oats for additional binding and texture.  The seasoning was kept simple in order to avoid overshadowing the subtle squash flavor.  Because this was another spontaneous kitchen project, I merely approximated the amounts of each ingredient, which were as follows:


Hubbard squash puree
Cooked chickpeas, drained and mashed
Onion, diced
Garlic, minced
Red jalapeno, seeded and minced
Tahini
Ground oats
Salt and pepper
To make the bites, I mixed the all of the ingredients together and formed walnut-sized amounts of the mixture into spheres, then flattened them into roughly 1/4"-thick patties.  I cooked them in a lightly oiled, nonstick pan until they were hot and golden brown on both sides; I decided not to bake them (although I'm sure it would work fine) because I didn't want to wait so long for them to brown, and the stove-top method was easy enough.  The patties were tasty nibbles even without adornment, but I threw together a sweet dip to accompany them, anticipating that the condiment-loving tasters of the household would consider the bites too plain or dry for as-is noshing.  The simple dip consisted of jalapeno jelly, unsweetened soy yogurt, chopped cilantro, salt, and ground black pepper--a creamy, sweet foil for the savory bites.

3 comments:

  1. Those patties, I want those patties!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Those patties, I want those patties!

    ReplyDelete

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